Defenders of Wildlife

A lingering goodbye to some (not yet) endangered species

A lingering goodbye to some (not yet) endangered species
A lingering goodbye to some (not yet) endangered species

A lingering goodbye to some (not yet) endangered species

From my old ground-floor office window, I could see under the broad bridge-walkway that led from the parking lot to the main-floor building entrance. Throughout one spring, several years ago, I watched red-fox cubs grow and play and sleep there with their mother. They spent their days in the little woods that separated the widely spaced office buildings. Then came development: noisy machinery and concrete taking over their home. The woods vanished, except for a thin line of trees, and the foxes vanished, too. I don't know where they went or how they made their way through the busy streets and office buildings to a safer place, but no-one has seen them since.

At least we still have the geese, halting traffic as they cross the streets and parking lots with goslings trailing behind. They don't seem to worry about "civilization" encroaching on the remaining trees and grass and (artificial) lake. But then, they can fly away north come spring and return in the fall - foxes can't.

Neither the foxes nor the geese are on the endangered species list yet, but if we don't do something to keep the planet from being turned into one giant, polluted parking lot intersected by high-rises, it can happen.

I wish I had thought to take pictures of the foxes, but it's too late for that. At least I have photos of a family of geese commuting on the road beside yet another artificial lake.

 

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